No Rules Wild Swimming

I call this “off road swimming” instead of “wild swimming.” The official name, or rather the name that swimmers use to describe this type of swimming is “open water” swimming. Given a choice, I’d go off road and swim in a river before swimming in a pool.

Of course, some rivers aren’t meant for swimming because they are too polluted, and others have current that’s too fast or aren’t deep enough, but that’s a whole other story.

Here in Austin, we have several places that you can go to experience open water swimming. There’s Barton Creek pool, but there are also lots of swimming beaches out on Lake Travis, and if you’re really into it you can even race in an open water race.

One of my favorite open water races happens in Town Lake every spring and it’s called the “Cap2k.” It’s 2000 meters in Town Lake, from Red Bud island to the Texas Rowing Dock. It’s an awesome race and it’s “downhill” meaning that you’re swimming with the current and not against it.

There are a whole lot of other open water races, check out the ASA’s website for more information on how to particiapte.

Point being, if you have the chance, I recommend you check out those swim races and join the “off road” swimming club.

Amplify’d from www.bbc.co.uk

No diving? No bombing? No rules swimming

Wild swimmers

Columnist Matthew Parris has been called “ignorant” and his actions “dangerous” after swimming across London’s River Thames. But up and down the country, people are dipping a toe in the trend for outdoor swimming, writes Tom de Castella.

It’s a sultry July afternoon and about 30 bathers are floating, chatting and breast-stroking their way through the cool, green water. Oak trees, willows and birch overhang the pond, moorhens pick their way across the shallows and a flock of Canada geese swoops down overhead.

If it wasn’t for the brightly coloured bikinis and vigilant lifeguards one might almost mistake it for a pagan immersion ceremony. And yet this is Hampstead Heath, only four miles from central London.

The idyllic scene reflects the growing popularity of “wild swimming”.

Read more at www.bbc.co.uk